THE RISE AND RISE OF BRITISH WAR MEMORIALS

Second Brigade Light Division cemetery overlooking Sebastopol    

Gradual changes in social attitudes in the late 19th century led to a greater concern about the soldiers fighting around Europe and the Empire, as individuals. Whereas in the early part of the century, dead soldiers (except some officers of course) were dumped into mass pits, their bones later dug up and turned into fertilizer, now cemeteries began to spring up in distant battlefields.

Books with romantic engravings of the cemeteries began to be produced, memorialising the battles and showing where the dead were buried.

Today British military dead (and the contracted out dead of other nations) are being cared for worldwide by the Commonwealth Graves Commission. The Commonwealth Graves Commission cares for British military graves and memorials in 148 countries.